April 1st, 2010

Table of Contents:

The Right Rice (Nutrition and diabetes)

Knee Replacement Surgery and Balance (Fall prevention)

Blood Pressure Levels and Dementia (A major trial planned)

Obesity and Colon Cancer (Medical research)

So Long, Winter! (Inspiration)

The Right Rice

by American Senior Fitness Association

To lower one's risk for type 2 diabetes, choose brown rice over white. That's the word from a large-scale study recently presented during the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference.The analysis involved data on the long-term dietary consumption of more than 39,000 men and more than 157,000 women. Results:

Those who had five or more servings of white rice a week were found to be 17 percent more likely to develop the condition, compared to those who had less than one serving of white rice a month.

Those who had two or more servings of brown rice a week were 11 percent less likely to develop the condition, compared to those who had less than one serving of brown rice a month.

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Knee Replacement Surgery and Balance

by American Senior Fitness Association

For elderly patients a knee replacement may do more than reduce the pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee, according to a study described at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in March. A new knee joint may also improve balance.

The study's subjects were 63 persons, average age 73, who underwent total knee replacements. One year following their surgeries, all of the subjects enjoyed significant improvement regarding measures of balance. "We are learning that pain relief may not be the only benefit that improves function after knee replacement," said the study's lead author Dr. Leonid Kandel, as reported by HealthDay.

Interestingly, researchers found that the relationship between improved balance and the patients' ability to walk and perform ADLs (activities of daily living) was stronger than that between decreased pain and their ability to walk and perform ADLs.

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Blood Pressure Levels and Dementia

by American Senior Fitness Association

Is there a definitive link between high blood pressure and cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease? That is a question the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will seek to answer through its upcoming Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT).

This autumn, the NIH will begin enrolling participants in SPRINT, the most ambitious trial to date designed to determine whether reducing systolic pressure below the currently recommended level of 140 mm Hg can also reduce the risk for age-related dementia. Some subjects will be randomly assigned to a program endeavoring to keep systolic pressure below 120.

This trial will involve 7,500 persons. The participants, all age 55-plus, will be followed-up for at least four years.

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Obesity and Colon Cancer

by American Senior Fitness Association

Although researchers have long agreed that obesity is a risk factor for developing colon cancer, its effects on colon cancer survival are less well-understood. However, a recent study published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research sheds new light on the subject.

The investigation, which was conducted over an eight-year period, involved more than 4,000 patients with colon cancer. While it did not prove a direct cause-and-effect link between obesity and long-term survival, it did suggest a relationship — especially in men.

Of the normal-weight men who entered the study, 53 percent were still alive after eight years. Of the severely-obese men who entered the study, 42 percent were still alive after eight years. They were 35 percent more likely to die during the study than were men of normal weight.

Whether and how obesity influences colon cancer prognosis, as well as greater clarity regarding its effects on female colon cancer patients specifically, will require further study. Meanwhile, researchers advise colon cancer patients to aim for a body mass index (BMI, a measure of body weight in relation to height) of under 30.

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So Long, Winter!

by American Senior Fitness Association

As springtime begins tempting us to get outdoors again and take a nice long walk, the words of American author Christopher Darlington Morley (1890-1957) capture the feeling:

"April prepares her green traffic light and the world thinks Go."

        — Christopher Morley, John Mistletoe

 

 

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