Posts Tagged ‘eating’

Even a small amount of belly fat can be harmful

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

Even a small amount of belly fat can be harmful. During a study at the Mayo Clinic, participants who were asked to gain just nine pounds showed a greater tendency of reduced endothelial function, most notably when the weight gain appeared around their middle. Researcher Dr. Virend K. Somers noted that “There is something about fat deposited in the belly that makes it potentially hazardous to health, because impaired endothelial function has been linked to increased risk of high blood pressure and blood vessel disease.” Please click below for a report from HealthDay.

 

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Why Is the Mediterranean Diet So Heart-Healthy?

Thursday, July 1st, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Among other beneficial foods, the "Mediterranean diet" features virgin olive oil, which researchers believe may support heart health by repressing genes that promote inflammation. Scientists at the University of Cordoba, Spain, recently studied a small group of patients with metabolic syndrome — which increases one’s risks for both heart disease and type 2 diabetes — and published their findings in BMC Genomics (11:253), a journal of BioMed Central.

Specifically, the researchers sought to learn more about how a diet abundant in "phenol compounds" (found in olive oil, especially the extra-virgin types) influenced the workings of genes. While acknowledging that other lifestyle factors may also contribute to the lower risk for cardiovascular disease in the Mediterranean region, the study’s authors wrote: "These results provide at least a partial molecular basis for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease observed in Mediterranean countries, where virgin olive oil represents a main source of dietary fat." To view this research article, click here.

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Fibromyalgia and Exercise

Monday, May 17th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

As reported by HealthDay, a recent Norwegian study found that physical exercise and weight control may help ward off fibromyalgia. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology followed 16,000 Norwegian women for 11 years, during which time 380 developed fibromyalgia. Below are several important findings from the study:

  • Women who exercised at least four times a week had a 29 percent lower risk for fibromyalgia, compared to inactive women.
  • Women who exercised two to three times a week were approximately 11 percent less likely to develop the condition.
  • Women who were overweight (with a Body Mass Index of 25 or more) had a 60 to 70 percent higher risk for developing fibromyalgia, compared to women with a healthy body weight.
  • However, overweight women who exercised at least one hour per week were less likely to develop fibromyalgia than were inactive overweight women.
  • Since this investigation did not prove a direct cause and effect between exercise or body weight and fibromyalgia, more research is being called for. Patrick Wood, MD, of the National Fibromyalgia Association told HealthDay that exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight may be helpful in avoiding the condition, and that doing both are especially prudent for people with a family history of fibromyalgia.

    This research was published in the American College of Rheumatology’s journal Arthritis Care & Research (62:12). To read the abstract, click on http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123268508/abstract.

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    The Right Rice

    Thursday, April 1st, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    To lower one's risk for type 2 diabetes, choose brown rice over white. That's the word from a large-scale study recently presented during the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference.The analysis involved data on the long-term dietary consumption of more than 39,000 men and more than 157,000 women. Results:

    Those who had five or more servings of white rice a week were found to be 17 percent more likely to develop the condition, compared to those who had less than one serving of white rice a month.

    Those who had two or more servings of brown rice a week were 11 percent less likely to develop the condition, compared to those who had less than one serving of brown rice a month.

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    Nutrition in 2010

    Wednesday, January 6th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    Well, here’s one common-sense take on weight control:

    "People are so worried about what they eat between Christmas and the New Year, but they really should be worried about what they eat between the New Year and Christmas."

    – Author Unknown

     

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