Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Winter Delight

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

During the chilly season, warmed fruit dishes make cozy treats. So here’s a delicious breakfast idea that you may wish to share with your senior fitness clients and try out yourself at home. Simply drizzle a little honey onto fresh grapefruit halves. Microwave on high for about one minute if the grapefruit started out at room temperature, or for about two minutes if it came straight out of the refrigerator.

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More on Obesity

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Despite the very best of intentions, a New Year’s resolution to lose body fat may be more difficult for some people to fulfill than for others. New brain scan research indicates that in obese persons, neural activity in the brain may encourage over-eating. Writing in a recent issue of Science News, Janet Raloff explained the problem:

After a hungry person eats a meal, blood sugar glucose levels return to normal. In people of normal weight, this causes the shut-down of a neural system that promotes positive feelings toward food. It is the brain’s way of acknowledging satiation and signaling that the need for calories has been met. At that point, normal-weight persons stop eating.

But in obese persons, the system may not turn off following a meal. No matter how much they have just eaten, it still lights up at the sight of rich, high-calorie fare. This can occur even though blood sugar glucose levels have returned to normal. It may contribute to the persistence of obesity in some individuals who have tried and failed repeatedly to lose body fat.

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A Low-Fat, Whole-Grain Treat

Monday, December 5th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

With the holiday season upon us, there will be visitors and house guests — perhaps including grandchildren. What to serve them as a healthy snack? The American Diabetic Association recommends popcorn, but without the salt and butter. Instead, try flavoring popcorn with:

  • Low-fat parmesan cheese;
  • Garlic and basil seasoning;
  • A dash of spice (for example, pepper, paprika or chili powder);
  • A few chocolate chips; or
  • A dab of peanut butter.
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White-Flesh Fruits & Veggies

Friday, September 30th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Take a moment to consider this question: What are your favorite fresh foods? Researchers stress the importance of enjoying a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, including those with edible sections that are red, purple, green, orange, yellow or white. So, do keep eating colorfully! However, Dutch researchers have discovered that fruits and veggies whose flesh is white may be value-added in terms of lowering one’s risk for stroke, as reported by the NIH publication MedlinePlus.

The Dutch study looked at food-frequency data collected from more than 20,000 participants, ages 20 through 65, who did not have signs of heart disease at the start of the project. During a 10-year follow-up period, 233 of the participants experienced a stroke.

Plant foods were categorized into four major color groupings:

  • Red/purple;
  • Green;
  • Orange/yellow; and
  • White.
  • The only category associated with significantly lower stroke risk was the white fruits and vegetables group. It included:

  • Apples;
  • Apple sauce and apple juice;
  • Pears;
  • Bananas;
  • Cucumbers;
  • Cauliflower;
  • Mushrooms; and
  • Chicory.
  • For every 25 grams of white-flesh fruits and veggies eaten per day, there was a nine percent reduction in stroke risk. Compared to the study’s participants who ate very few white fruits and vegetables, those with a high intake had a 52 percent lower risk of stroke incidence.

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    New evidence indicates that many age related eye problems may be preventable

    Monday, December 13th, 2010

    A study at the University of Iceland found that “over one in 10 people in their 60s and nearly one in four in their late 70s have an early form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).” According to study author Dr. Fridbert Jonasson, other recent studies have found that antioxidants and a diet rich in “fatty fish” may lower the risk of AMD. He noted that early detection of AMD “means that we can start this treatment early, so hopefully reduce the risk of late AMD.” Click below for a Medline report.

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    Whey, a cheese by-product, has been shown to help “significantly reduce elevated blood pressure.”

    Thursday, December 9th, 2010

    Researchers at Washington State University found that “daily doses of commonly available whey brought a more than six-point reduction in the average blood pressure of men and women with elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures.” They noted that this level of reduction “can reduce cardiovascular disease and bring a 35 to 40 percent reduction in fatal strokes.” Lead researcher Susan Fluegel also noted that it is a low-cost supplement and that “whey protein has not been shown to be harmful in any way.” Please click below for a report from EurekAlerts

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    Healthful Eating

    Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    The Humane Society of the United States produces a lively DVD series called the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" that reviews cutting edge research published in peer reviewed scientific nutrition journals and provides practical tips on eating to prevent, treat and even reverse disease. This series provides strong support for the belief held by many that a humane diet is also the healthiest.

    Hosting the series is Michael Greger, MD, the director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture in the farm animal welfare division of the Human Society. A physician specializing in clinical nutrition, Dr. Greger focuses his work on the human health implications of intensive animal agriculture, including the routine use of non-therapeutic antibiotics and growth hormones in animals raised for food, and the public health threats of industrial factory farms. He is a founding member of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, a respected author and an invited lecturer at universities, medical schools and conferences worldwide. To view an invigorating 68-minute video of Dr. Greger conducting a highly informative nutritional presentation, click here.

    There are four fascinating volumes in the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD series. A new volume is added each year. They range in length from 90 minutes to approximately three hours, and cover numerous topics of contemporary interest. For example, volume 4 alone features 99 chapters, including the following examples:

  • Latest on alfalfa sprouts
  • Latest of aspartame
  • Latest on coffee
  • Latest on gluten
  • The healthiest herbal tea
  • Best fruits for cancer prevention
  • Improving memory through diet
  • Dietary osteoarthritis treatment
  • New cholesterol fighters
  • Statin muscle toxicity
  • Dietary theory of Alzheimer’s
  • Exercise and breast cancer
  • Anabolic steroids in meat
  • Obesity-causing pollutants in food
  • Plant-based diets and mood
  • Licorice: helpful?
  • Vinegar: helpful?
  • Vitamin D pills vs tanning beds
  • Mitochondrial theory of aging
  • The three preceding volumes address hundreds of intriguing topics, such as:

  • Preventing cancer: which foods to avoid
  • Preventing cancer: which foods to eat
  • How to eliminate constipation
  • The food that can drop your cholesterol 20 points
  • The healthiest beverage
  • The food that cuts your fatal heart attack risk in half
  • The one supplement everyone eating a healthy diet needs
  • Black pepper: helpful?
  • Oranges vs orange juice
  • Honeybush tea
  • Fish: omega 3s and mercury
  • Sun-dried vs golden raisins
  • The best bean
  • The best mushroom
  • Should people take antioxidant supplements?
  • What’s the #1 cancer fighting vegetable?
  • What’s the healthiest sweetener?
  • How does one alter one’s brain waves through diet?
  • Recipe of the year
  • The Humane Society Press (HSP) points out that the world’s longest life expectancy is found in California Adventist vegetarians. According to the HSP, they live 10 years longer than the general population and enjoy lower rates of many of the chronic diseases that plague Americans, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, obesity and certain cancers. For additional details and ordering information on the "Latest in Clinical Nutrition" DVD series, click on HumaneSociety.org/nutrition.

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    Get Real

    Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    "If we’re not willing to settle for junk living, we certainly shouldn’t settle for junk food."

         — Pioneer of the Olympic sport of triathlon, Sally Edwards

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    Smart Eats

    Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    At the Experimental Biology 2010 Meeting held recently in Anaheim, California, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) presented a scientific program including this important news:

    A study of nearly 4,000 persons, ages 65-plus, found that those who most closely followed a Mediterranean diet reduced their risk for cognitive decline with aging. The subjects’ cognitive skills were tested every three years for 15 years. Those with the highest adherence to the diet were the least likely to experience mental decline.

    The study’s lead author Dr. Christy Tangney, of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, said in an ASN news release: "This diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits, fish, olive oil, lower meat consumption, and moderate wine and non-refined grain intake. Instead of espousing avoidance of foods, the data support that adults over age 65 should look to include more olive oil, legumes, nuts, and seeds in their diet in order to improve their recall times and other cognitive skills, such as identifying symbols and numbers."

    In addition, Dr. Tangney said, "…we want older adults to remember that physical activity is an important part of maintaining cognitive skills."

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    A Leading Doctor’s Opinion

    Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    "Leave your drugs in the chemist’s pot if you can heal the patient with food."

         — Hippocrates

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