Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Sometimes You Feel Like a…

Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Nut consumption has been linked to improved cholesterol levels by an analysis of studies published recently in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Results indicated that enjoying approximately 2.3 ounces of nuts daily decreased total cholesterol levels by 5.1 percent and LDL cholesterol (the "undesirable" type) by 7.4 percent. It improved the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (the "desirable" type) by 8.3 percent and reduced triglyceride levels by 10.2 percent in persons with high triglycerides.

Although the strongest evidence for nuts’ helpful effects has come from research involving walnuts and almonds, other types of nuts have also been found beneficial. They include pecans, peanuts, macadamias, hazelnuts and pistachios.

Due to their high caloric content, nuts can contribute to unhealthy weight gain if eaten in excess. However, moderate nut-eating can add useful dietary fiber, vegetable proteins, vitamins, antioxidants and cholesterol-lowering unsaturated fat to the diet.

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One Last Morsel of Wisdom

Friday, November 5th, 2010 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

"He that takes medicine and neglects diet, wastes the skill of the physician."

     — Chinese Proverb

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Following a Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

A Spanish study indicates that following a Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. The study of 418 older adults also showed that benefits were obtained independent of weight change. Dietitian and diabetes educator, Constance Brown-Riggs, “cautioned against seeing olive oil, or any single component of the Mediterranean diet, as a magic bullet … what we’re talking about here is an overall eating pattern, and an overall lifestyle.” Please click below for a report from Medline Plus.

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Extra-virgin olive oil may help protect the liver

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

A study indicates that extra-virgin olive oil, an integral component of the Mediterranean diet may help protect the liver. Researcher Mohamed Hammami stated that the study had shown “extra virgin olive oil and its extracts protect against oxidative damage of hepatic tissue.” He also noted that there “is growing evidence that it may have great health benefits including the reduction in coronary heart disease risk, the prevention of some cancers and the modification of immune and inflammatory responses.” Please click below for a report from Ivanhoe.com.

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A compound found in plants such as peppers, carrots and celery may help reduce memory deficits

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Luteolin, a compound found in plants such as peppers, carrots and celery may help reduce memory deficits. The results of a study conducted at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, indicated that luteolin can help protect the brain against inflammation, “a key contributor to age-related memory problems.” Study leader Rodney Johnson added that “these data suggest that consuming a healthy diet has the potential to reduce age-associated inflammation in the brain, which can result in better cognitive health.” For a report from ScienceDaily, please click below.

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The National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute of NIH has produced a creative, heart-smart cookbook

Monday, September 20th, 2010

For tasty heart-healthy eating, check out Keep the Beat Recipes: Deliciously Healthy Dinners from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of NIH (the National Institutes of Health). To sample one satisfying main dish featured in the cookbook, Chicken and Mushroom Fricassee, click here . For ordering information, click below.

 

 

 

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Vitamin E has been shown to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

In a 6 year Swedish study of 232 participants, all 80 years old or more, those with higher blood levels of vitamin E components had a greatly reduced risk, 45% to 54%, of developing Alzheimer’s. Please click here to see a ScienceDaily report or below for a brief video presentation from HealthDay.

 

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Low levels of the B vitamin, folate, can lead to poor brain function

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

Ongoing research by the University of California-San Francisco, in cooperation with the USDA, is intended to discover more about the relationship between B vitamins and brain health. Current results have shown that lower levels of the B vitamin, folate, are “associated with symptoms of dementia and poor brain function.” Women participants with these lower levels also appeared to have a much greater predisposition for symptoms of depression. Click below for a report from USDA/Agricultural Research Service.

 

 

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Short term overeating can lead to long term body fat

Friday, September 3rd, 2010

As little as one month of overeating combined with inactivity can have lasting adverse effects. A small Swedish study showed that participants who followed an increased calorie diet and restricted activity (5000 or less steps per day), had increased body fat two years later. Please click below for a report from Medscape.

 

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We may be able to add berries and nuts to our cognitive health toolkit

Friday, August 27th, 2010

Researchers presenting a study at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) concluded that some berries, including blueberries, strawberries, acai berries and possibly even walnuts, may “activate the brain’s natural ‘housekeeper’ mechanism, which cleans up and recycles toxic proteins linked to age-related memory loss and other mental decline.” Please click below to see a press release from EurekAlert!

 

 

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