Topic: General

One Terrific Role Model

Friday, April 15th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Today the American Senior Fitness Association (SFA) celebrates the career of an outstanding SFA author and longtime friend of SFA members: James Evans. We will begin with two timely articles from Jim and then wrap things up with his impressive professional profile.

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Thanks, Jack!

Friday, April 15th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Quoted by Jim Evans in a 1996 SFA article, Jack LaLanne encouraged seniors this way: “Challenge yourself. Swim against the clock and swim vigorously.” He added, “Exercise should be a daily habit. Just get up and do it!” In today’s issue of Experience! Jim Evans provides further insight into the man he knew. Also included are several photographs that Jack gave to Jim over the years.

DEAR JIM: I was saddened to learn about the passing of Jack LaLanne, but, frankly, I wasn’t surprised. I thought he should have died years ago performing some of those crazy stunts of his. I used to exercise to his TV show in the fifties — I’m 75 now — but I quit working out years ago because I thought he took exercise too seriously. After all, doesn’t it just prove that no matter what we do to take care of ourselves, we will all die eventually anyway? DOUBTING THOMAS

DOUBTING THOMAS: Wow! You certainly missed Jack’s message by a mile!

Jack had no illusions about living forever, even though he joked that “dying would ruin his image.” And he often said – very honestly – that he didn’t work out because he “liked it” but, rather, because it enhanced his quality of life as he grew older and allowed him to continue to do things that people half his age had long since give up because they were simply “too old.”

“People don’t die of old age,” he said. “They die of inactivity.”

I first met Jack LaLanne (www.jacklalanne.com/) on his birthday – September 26 – in 1968 at the grand opening of the European Health Spa in Dublin, Ohio. Of course, I had grown up with Jack, watching him on TV with my mother in the fifties, but it is something else when you get to meet a legend in person.

Several hundred people had gathered to see the new club but, more important, they wanted to meet the guest of honor – the “godfather of fitness.” Small in stature – he was only about 5’6” – Jack was “big” in personality with a terrific sense of humor. As he was about to speak to the crowd, a very large woman elbowed her way rudely to the front of the room to see the fitness icon in person. The crowd grumbled audibly but parted so that she could get by, curious about her purpose. Finally, face to face with Jack, she looked him up and down and appeared noticeably crestfallen.

“Why,” she said with disappointment, “you’re not any bigger than my husband.”

“That’s right,” replied Jack with a big grin. “The difference with me is that everything still works.”

The crowd erupted in laughter as he gave her a big hug.

I ran into Jack many times during my 44 years in the fitness industry, and he was always the same outgoing, friendly, fun-loving guy with a positive attitude about life. While many so-called fitness experts have had more academic credentials or titles than Jack, no one could sell the concept of physical fitness with more natural enthusiasm – more passion – than Jack. He made exercise fun.

“Better to wear out than rust out,” he said. He was right, you know. Why don’t you put away your cynicism and start doing something physical? I know Jack would approve.

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Need Weed?

Friday, April 15th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

It’s a poorly kept secret that many senior citizens have both longstanding and ongoing experience in the use of marijuana. But did you know that physical exercise might curb the urge to partake? Jim Evans explains below.


DEAR JIM: I’ve been smoking “weed” most of my life – since I was about 20. I’m 73 now and I still smoke 3-4 joints a day. I’ve thought about quitting from time to time, but it helps me relax and it’s pretty much of a habit now anyway. As you can probably guess, I’m pretty laid back after all these years, but I have been experiencing an increasing number of panic attacks as I grow older. I know there isn’t any
way to treat my dependence with medication, and I really don’t want to quit anyway, but I’m wondering if some kind of physical activity might help me to cut back a little. POTHEAD FROM POMONA

DEAR POTHEAD: Until recently I couldn’t really say whether exercise might be a factor in curbing marijuana use or not. However, a recent study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center seems to indicate that exercise might actually curb both marijuana use and cravings.

The study, published earlier this year in the journal PLoS ONE , found that, after just a few sessions of running on treadmill, participants who were admittedly “cannabis-dependent” but did not want treatment to stop smoking pot, experienced a significant decrease in both cravings and daily use.

In fact, their craving for and use of cannabis was cut by more than 50 percent after exercising on a treadmill for 30-minute sessions over a two-week period. Researchers measured the amount of exercise needed for each individual to reach 60-70 percent of their maximum heart rate respectively, creating a personalized exercise treadmill program for each participant.

“This is 10 sessions but it actually went down after the first five. The maximum reduction was already there within the first week,” said co-author Peter Martin, M.D., director of the Vanderbilt Addiction Center.>

“There is no way currently to treat cannabis dependence with medication, so this is big considering the magnitude of the cannabis problem in the U.S. And this is the first time it has ever been demonstrated that exercise can reduce cannabis use in people who don’t want to stop.”

The importance of this study – and future studies – will only continue to grow with the new knowledge of the role of physical activity in health and disease, according to co-author Maciej (Mac) Buchowski, Ph.D, Research Professor of Medicine and director of the Vanderbilt Energy Balance Laboratory.

“It shows that exercise can really change the way the brain works and the way the brain responds to the world around us,” added Martin. “And this is vital to health and has implications for all of medicine.”

More research will need to be done to substantiate these findings, but it certainly sounds promising. In the meantime, you might start walking for 30 minutes a day – on a treadmill or otherwise – and gradually increase the pace and see what happens. You can do your own personal experiment to see if it helps you to cut back on your pot smoking. If not, at least you’ll be in better shape.

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Who’s Who in Senior Fitness

Friday, April 15th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

SFA author Jim Evans is a 43-year veteran of the health and fitness industry and internationally recognized consultant specializing in fitness for seniors. For seven years he was host of the popular radio talk show "Forever Young" on San Diego’s KCBQ 1170 AM focusing on issues of health, fitness, and quality of life for older adults. He is a member of the Visionary Board for the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA), focusing exclusively on the health and wellness of adults 50 years and older. Association members include people working within senior housing and retirement communities, recreation, academia, government agencies, and fitness and rehabilitation centers.

For nine years Jim served as chairman of the advisory board for the San Diego Retired & Senior Volunteer Program overseeing the fundraising and volunteer activities of more than 2,700 older adults at more than 250 worksites in San Diego (California) County.

Jim has been published in dozens of magazines and newspapers over the years including Successful Retirement, 55 & Fine, Good Age, Economic Community, Living Better, Men’s Exercise, Motor Home, Under the Sun, Senior Life San Diego, Club and Resort Business, Exercise for Men Only, Iron Man, and many, many more. His editorials have appeared in the San Diego Business Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, Des Moines Register, Minneapolis Star Tribune, and others. He is the author of "Senior Health & Fitness," a monthly column published in more than 750 markets across the country (since 1992) and is a popular and well-known speaker available for speaking engagements through World Class Speakers & Entertainers.

He was the owner and president of the Peninsula Athletic Club in San Diego, the largest health, fitness, and recreational complex in California – a 200,000 square foot facility on 546 acres serving more than 3,500 members and more than 250 schools and community groups. The facility hosted such historic events as the International BMW Dealers Convention and the San Diego Grand Prix and provided lodging and services for the 1999 Mexican Women’s soccer team during the World Cup and the 2000 U.S. Olympic Team. The club was sold in 2002 to Multi-Line Fitness International, an international chain of upscale health clubs in the U.S. and Canada. Jim currently works as vice president of sales and marketing for the SIM Corporation dba Bay Area Family Fitness in addition to his consulting and freelance writing.

A former world-class powerlifter and collegiate wrestler, Jim is a charter member of the ABCC Natural Bodybuilding Hall of Fame (1985) and was the sole inductee in the U.S. Natural Bodybuilding Hall of Fame in 2009. He was the founder of the North American Natural Bodybuilding Association (NANBA) — now NANBF — in 1984 and hosted the first World Natural Bodybuilding Federation (WNBF) pro natural competition — the Natural Universe – in 1990. He is an alumnus of The Ohio State University in Columbus where he majored in English and served as president of the Ohio State Weightlifting Club. He was a member of the varsity wrestling team at Ohio State on a full athletic grant-in-aid.

Jim and his wife Jacquie grew up in Des Moines, Iowa, and currently live in Dublin, California. They have four children and nine grandchildren.

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Spring Has Sprung!

Thursday, March 24th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

The American Senior Fitness Association (SFA) hopes the first quarter of 2011 has gotten this new year off to a great start for all our members and readers! We’re celebrating Spring with tremendous savings on SFA’s award-winning professional education programs. Applauded by the National Council on Aging, SFA distance-learning continuing education courses are convenient, practical, and comprehensive.

So if you’d like to add a senior-specific fitness credential to your resume, to earn continuing education credits accepted by most fitness organizations or both, be sure to order by Monday, April 4, 2011, and take advantage of these discounts.

Plus, here’s some extra good news for you early birds! Order your program by Monday, March 28, and SFA will pay the shipping.

So don’t delay. Click here to order online or call SFA at 888-689-6791 to take advantage of this special opportunity.

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Specialties

Thursday, March 24th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

Recent comments on the Brain Fitness for Older Adults professional education program:

  • "I could not put the materials back down because it was so fascinating. I loved the video. Very informative." Margaret, Tennessee
  • "I liked the suggested plans for brain fitness projects, and covering just enough historical and physiological content. Good mix of reading and video content. Very good program." Lori, Virginia
  • "I liked the variety of material — practical and theoretical. The references were excellent, and the additional resources were helpful." Suzanne, Oklahoma
  • "Material presented well. Amount of material is a bit overwhelming." Mary, Pennsylvania
  • "I liked the simplicity of materials and instruction sheet suggestions to complete class." Leslie, California
  • "Very easy to understand — even technical terms made sense." Betty, Illinois
  • "Extremely educational, comprehensive, and practical! Thank you so much for making this unique course available!! It will be invaluable for helping my clients maintain and improve their quality of life!" Hope, Florida
  • Recent comments on the Long Term Care Fitness Leader professional education program:

  • "As an activity coordinator in LTC facilities for the past 12 years, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed studying for this course — Part One and Two! Plan to take more courses from SFA. Will share much of what I’ve learned with the staff at my ALF workplace. Very informative!" Elise, Florida
  • "Great information. Very useful material that can actually be applied to real life situations. Truly enjoyed this applicable material. I was refreshed by the material and I also learned a few new techniques and ideas. Material is very helpful whether as a beginner or a refreshment course. Very good!" Jose, New Mexico
  • "What I liked most about the course — Everything!! I enjoyed all the materials and videos. I liked the way these were organized and boxed in sets for future reference. I liked the wide range of topics covered. I especially enjoyed the in-depth coverage on arthritis, as well as the overview of commonly prescribed medications and their effects on exercise." Mary, Illinois
  • "I liked the conversational, practical writing style. Helpful information." Cathy, Maryland
  • "All great! I liked the information flow and the in-depth info. Great info." Debra, Ohio
  • "I loved all the terrific activity ideas that my frail elderly fitness participants can take part in both safely and successfully. These workouts and activties are fun, beneficial, and easy to conduct. They have my participants smiling, laughing, moving, and engaging with each other. Thanks a million, SFA!!! " Sharie, Florida
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    Staples

    Thursday, March 24th, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    Recent comments on the Senior Fitness Instructor professional education program:

  • "I am glad I chose your organization for this course! Great materials! Lots of great information that I can use for reference over and over again! I liked the materials included. I like that you
    had everything to work with. The manual is very good and useful as a reference." Pauline, Washington
  • "I enjoyed having my eyes opened to some very important matters concerning critical areas for seniors." Randall, Texas
  • "Terms I have encountered in my [organization name omitted] exam materials, which weren’t fully explained, were clarified much better with SFA materials. And I like that the course is specifically dealing with seniors and not the whole population." Joan, California
  • "I liked the exercises displayed with each section. It will be helpful in class planning." Cindy, Missouri
  • "I wish more [organization name omitted] credit courses (by other companies) were as well laid out and knowledgeable in their subjects. I have been [organization name omitted] certified for 15 years and this is one of the best correspondence courses! Extremely well organized and, most importantly, the questions and content are useful for this subject area." Rachel, Washington
  • "Thank you for this wonderful program. Though it has taken me a while to complete, it was well worth it. I found both courses (Part One and Two) to be informative and thorough. I look forward to helping others and being a positive role model for the American Senior Fitness Association. Great material! Very informative relative to senior safety during exercise. Enjoyed all aspects… I enjoyed the study of specific exercises and programs for senior adults — also, information regarding nutrition. I would also like to mention the professionalism of the staff at SFA, particularly Grant. He is always kind, polite and able to answer my questions. Thank you!" Sydney, Michigan
  • "I love this course! I like your open book approach. I learned so much. Once I opened the book I could not put it down. I love the exercise plans as well as the motivation chapter. Thanks! I liked all the information about risk factors and senior nutrition. I learned a lot. Thanks for this opportunity to become a senior fitness instructor. Although persons aged 65 and older comprise only about 12 percent of the U.S. population, I see my future as a senior fitness instructor wide open." Graziella, New Hampshire
  • "This is one of the best manuals for older adults that I have found in my studies! Many thanks to Janie Clark! The content of the course is excellent and most useful. It was especially helpful having the exercises pictured along with the ‘instructor-to-client’ information and the ‘teaching tips and ideas.’" Mary, Florida
  • "Great review and reinforcement of what I’ve been teaching for years!! I am an RN and have been a group fitness instructor for over 25 years! Thanks for all." Rebecca, North Carolina
  • "Interesting, very informative, very practical and can use right away. The variety offered for different types of health situations and training for many types of clients who want to exercise and get in shape is appreciated." Laurie, Massachusetts
  • "Great program. Will add to my current training schedule for older clients. Enjoyed the reading material. Nicely written, easy to follow." Kathryn, California
  • "The information content was interesting and easy to understand. The staff is excellent and very accessible." Linda, Nevada
  • "I liked the content. Good course!" Jane, New York
  • "I gained a better understanding of the benefits of exercise for the older adult population." Sylvia, Tennessee
  • "I liked the organization of material. Great course!" Sophia, Massachusetts
  • "I liked the simplicity." Adam, Minnesota
  • "The detail on the exercise routines — excellent! And the pictures were very helpful. I appreciate the workbooks for future reference. Very comprehensive." Beth, California
  • "Instantly useable information. Extremely in-depth. Very informative." Melissa, Ohio
  • "Very thorough and organized by subject areas." Juliana, Colorado
  • "Well organized, easy to understand, no trick questions on test [happy face symbol]." Kathryn, Massachusetts
  • "I could go at my own pace. I could fill out the exam as I studied. Thanks!!" Laura, North Carolina
  • "Easy to follow." Elaine, Florida
  • "Very thorough and organized presentation." Juliana, Colorado
  • "Wonderful programming ideas, clearly presented. Lots of creative ideas for teaching seniors. DVDs were very enjoyable." Mary, Illinois
  • "Great course. I liked the organization of the information." Nikki, South Carolina
  • "Challenging. I liked the fitness tips I could use right away." Carma, Washington
  • "Very comprehensive. Thoroughly addresses all the aspects of instructing senior fitness classes." Denise, Colorado
  • "I liked the DVDs that show
  • "I liked the overall education principles of senior fitness. I learned about training and teaching older adults and the health risks to consider." Tracy, Texas
  • "Keep up the great work! It was very complete!" Robert, Hawaii
  • "I liked the variety of topics and the depth they were covered, including info on medications. I liked all of the background information about older adults." Jennifer, California
  • "I appreciated the practical tips on setting up classes." Kelly, Nebraska
  • "Appreciated that it was so clear and concise. Made the material more enjoyable to read." Margaret, California
  • "Format, presentation — good." Grace, Illinois
  • "Great reference material." Leslie, Georgia
  • "Very easy to follow. Great study material." Megan, Washington
  • "Well thought out. Very thorough!" Eric, Washington
  • Recent comments on the Senior Personal Trainer professional education program:

  • "I liked the progression of content. Challenging and exciting even though I have a BS in physical education. The program is age-specific which is why I enrolled. I am energized and looking forward to taking more of your courses. Very courteous staff. Material well presented in a clear, concise manner and with systematic logical order." Barbara, New Hampshire
  • "I will recommend this course to others. Useful information." Nancy, New York
  • "I am looking forward to applying all study materials to my new career in senior personal training and to my own personal fitness program as a ‘senior’ myself! Thank you! I like all of the detailed information from start to finish. Very thorough and applicable to trainer and clients! I found value in the explanation of the seven fitness assessment tests, training goals, and implementation of functional fitness training. Thank you for the valuable work you do to assist trainers and clients to achieve healthy lifestyles as seniors!" Cathy, Louisiana
  • "It was very informative. I was able to apply it immediately." Mike, Oregon
  • "I liked all the great hands-on ideas, as well as the client handout sheets and functional fitness emphasis. The materials were well organized." Mary Ann, Illinois
  • "The course not only covered subject matter regarding the actual job of senior personal trainer, but also marketing and acquiring clients. I liked the anatomical details and explanations." Phillip, Arizona
  • "I personally enjoyed the ‘Contemporary Reading’ manual. I learned quite a bit about the most important psychological dynamics involved with the aging adult. I hope to put much of this into practice. I thought all the material was very well organized. The language and text were most understandable and applicable." Rebecca, New York
  • "The ‘Special Population Imperatives’ section was very educational and helpful. The information was easy to understand and was organized well." Daniel, Colorado
  • "The glossary of terms was very helpful. I learned a lot. Great, updated, current, well organized information." Ann, North Carolina
  • "The subject matter was interesting. I liked the information about fibromyalgia and the high blood pressure basics. I would like the design of the certificate to show more about the content completed." Elizabeth, Virginia
  • "I liked all of the handouts, forms on wellness, and questionnaires; the related lifestyles information; the goal-specific sections; and the examples of exercises and sample training forms." Renee, Nevada
  • "Important, practical, concise information that is immediately useful. Presented in an effective, retainable format. I liked the use of specific client and training examples. Great resource. Overall, good to excellent." Kimberly, Oregon
  • "I liked that the learning pace was my choice! I also found the information easy to follow but, at the same time, I learned a lot." Caitlin, Pennsylvania
  • "Terrific course! Though I have over 30 years experience as a personal trainer, the information gleaned from your course materials has further increased my confidence and comfort level for working with seniors in a one on one setting. Thank you again for this wonderful program! It will truly be an asset in my quest to be one of the most reputable senior fitness businesses in the state of Michigan. I learned so much with these tools!" Sydney, Michigan
  • "I liked the exercise promotion and suggestions for increasing the use of lower body exercise." Tim, California
  • "I felt it was all very informative. I especially liked the part on how to market yourself to older populations and all of the sample questions and handouts." Pamela, California
  • "Interesting, meaningful. I liked the range and depth of info." Debra, Ohio
  • "The knowledge of the material was excellent! It is very well written and easy to understand." Patricia, Iowa
  • "I liked the value of the information as it pertains to older adults, and that it focused specifically on older adults." Rick, Idaho
  • "Clear, concise. Info easy to follow." Juliana, Colorado
  • "Very easy to follow and well written." Whitney, New York
  • "The content was easy to read and gave me ideas I had forgotten about." Tracy, Texas
  • "Excellent course." Susan, Texas
  • "I especially liked Part III of ‘Contemporary Readings in Senior Personal Training,’ specifically ‘Exercise Psychology and the Aging Adult.’ Also especially liked chapter two of ‘Physiology and Health Promotion for Senior Fitness Professionals,’ specifically ‘Practical Exercise Science: Key Facts and Definitions.’" Carlo, Texas
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    Hip Hip Hooray!

    Thursday, March 3rd, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    Today we celebrate an outstanding leader in the field of older adult fitness and take a revealing look at his most recent book-length publication, which is entitled the Healthy Hips Handbook: Exercises for Treating and Preventing Common Hip Joint Injuries. In the book’s introduction, author Karl Knopf states that it "is designed to help prevent a hip problem for some and, for those of you with existing hip problems, provide post-rehabilitation exercises that you and your health-care provider can select to best meet your needs."

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    Who’s Who in Senior Fitness

    Thursday, March 3rd, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    Karl G. Knopf, Ed.D., is a long-time member of the American Senior Fitness Association (SFA) National Advisory Board. "Dr. Karl" — as his students affectionately call him — has been involved in the health and fitness area for the disabled and for mature adults for more than 30 years. Currently he is the coordinator of the Adaptive Fitness Therapy Program at Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, California.

    In the past Dr. Knopf has been a consultant for numerous grants, including National Institutes of Health grants. He is a frequent guest on the PBS "Sit and Be Fit" television series; has served as advisor to the State of California on fitness for the disabled; and has been featured in the LA Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other major publications discussing the benefits of physical activity for older adults.

    Dr. Knopf is the author of more than 10 books, including the following titles published by Ulysses Press: Stretching for 50 Plus, Weights for 50 Plus, and Sports Conditioning for 50 Plus. His latest book is the Healthy Hips Handbook (2010), which is also published by Ulysses Press.

    Dr. Knopf can be reached via email at knopfkarl@foothill.edu.

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    The Healthy Hips Handbook

    Thursday, March 3rd, 2011 by American Senior Fitness Association   View This Issue of Experience!

    SFA president Janie Clark has this to say about Karl Knopf as an older adult fitness author: "I have always loved Karl’s style because it is so clear, so practical, and so to-the-point. This is very true of his newest contribution, the Healthy Hips Handbook, which I am delighted to recommend for both senior fitness professionals and mature adult laypersons alike."

    The book, released in 2010 by Ulysses Press, is a reader-friendly manual that outlines causes and solutions for common hip problems. The publisher notes that millions of people suffer from debilitating hip conditions each year and that Knopf’s book offers easy-to-follow exercises to:

    Build strength,

    Improve flexibility,

    Hasten recovery, and

    Avoid future injury.

    It also features specially designed programs to help prevent common hip issues and to condition the body for successful participation in everyday activities, as well as in popular sports activities.

    The Healthy Hips Handbook begins with an overview and an illustrated discussion of the anatomy and functions of the hip joint. It moves on to describe the symptoms, usual causes, and treatment options regarding a number of prevalent hip-related concerns, including:

  • Groin strain,
  • Bursitis,
  • Snapping hip,
  • Iliotibial band fascitis,
  • Sciatic pain,
  • Hip dislocation,
  • Hip pointers,
  • Osteitis pubis,
  • Degenerative joint disease, and
  • Pelvic girdle fractures.
  • One useful and interesting provision in the manual is its section on self-massage. The author explains that massage can relax a muscle or, in some cases, invigorate it. Often massage will increase blood flow to the area and can release tension, prepare a joint for motion, or provide relief following an exercise/therapy session.

    The physical exercises presented by the handbook are divided into six categories, as follows:

  • Stretches
  • Standing activities,
  • Seated activities,
  • Floor activities,
  • Ball activities, and
  • Sports-ready activities.
  • There are more than 300 excellent step-by-step photographs of the exercises, all of which are accompanied by clear and concise written instructions. The physical exercise recommendations are augmented by helpful discussions of pertinent subjects, such as:

  • Hip replacement,
  • Micro versus macro trauma injuries,
  • Healthy hips lifestyle tips,
  • Healthy hips training tips, and a
  • Proper posture checklist.
  • Dr. Knopf is singularly qualified to provide exercise guidance to older adults and disabled persons. SFA president Janie Clark says, "In addition to his impressive academic credentials and professional achievements, Karl also has life experience that enhances and distinguishes his work." Once a college
    wrestler and triathlete, Dr. Knopf subsequently injured his back while lifting a patient out of a wheelchair. At that point, he adjusted his exercise routine to revolve around swimming and the use of a recumbent bicycle.

    "I learned from this experience what it is like to live with daily pain," he has said, adding with a touch of humor: "I think this makes me a better teacher because I feel worse than most of my students. I also know that if I don’t exercise I’ll feel even worse!" Indeed, he hasn’t let the injury slow him down very much, but has always remained active in every sense of the word.

    Regarding his work with older adult fitness participants, Dr. Knopf told SFA many years ago: "My philosophy is that I like for people to set themselves up to win." This approach shines through in the following short excerpt from the Healthy Hips Handbook. In the author’s own words:

    "It helps to know the areas of the body that are vulnerable to injury. Besides the hips, the knees, neck, low back, shoulders, and ankles are high-risk. Pay special attention when performing exercises that involve these areas, and follow these rules:

  • "Don’t allow your legs to spread too wide or too far forward or back.
  • "Always perform exercises with proper execution.
  • "Don’t neglect the small supporting actors of your hip joint (most of us focus on the ‘show’ muscles and forget the importance of these smaller muscles).
  • "Pay attention to how your head, upper back, and legs are positioned during activities of daily living and in the workplace."
  • The Healthy Hips Handbook contains 135 pages and retails for $14.95. Retail orders are shipped free of charge. California residents must include sales tax. For further information or to order the book, here’s how to contact the publisher:

  • Call 800-377-2542 or 510-601-8301,
  • Fax 510-601-8307,
  • Email ulysses@ulyssespress.com, or
  • Write to Ulysses Press, P.O. Box 3440, Berkeley CA 94703.
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