Senior Fitness News

Age of Champions is now on-line!

Friday, April 19th, 2013

The American Senior Fitness Association is pleased to help support the new PBS documentary, Age of Champions, and invites you, your friends, clients and colleagues to watch for free from April 18th – 28th at ageofchampions.org/premiere

Age of Champions tells the story of five competitors who sprint, leap, and swim for gold at the National Senior Olympics. You’ll meet a 100-year-old tennis champion, 86-year-old pole vaulter, and rough-and-tumble basketball grandmothers as they triumph over the limitations of age.

“All of the characters in the film have the conviction that the best in life still lies ahead of them. They show us how we can grow older with grace and good humor,” says Age of Champions director Christopher Rufo.

The film premiered to a standing ovation at the prestigious Silverdocs Film Festival, the Washington Post hailed it as “infectiously inspiring,” and it’s already shown at more than 1,000 venues around the world.

Share this resource with your friends, clients and colleagues by forwarding the following email!

AGE OF CHAMPIONS NATIONAL ONLINE PREMIERE
April 18th – 28th
Live Q A with the filmmakers on April 25th
www.ageofchampions.org/premiere

Share

Don’t miss new PBS documentary “Age of Champions”

Monday, April 15th, 2013

The American Senior Fitness Association invites you to watch the new PBS documentary “Age of Champions” for free between April 18 – 28! The film tells the story of five competitors up to 100 years old who sprint, leap, and swim for gold at the National Senior Olympics. Watch the trailer and see why the Washington Post called the film “infectiously inspiring” at ageofchampions.org/premiere

Share

The National Institutes of Health has information for older adults about anxiety disorders

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

The National Institutes of Health has added information about anxiety disorders to the NIHSeniorHealth.gov website. This concise resource includes “About Anxiety Disorders,” “Risk Factors and Causes,” “Symptoms and Diagnosis,” “Treatment and Research” and “Frequently Asked Questions.” It also provides links to additional resources. To view the NIH press release please click below.

Share

New evidence indicates that many age related eye problems may be preventable

Monday, December 13th, 2010

A study at the University of Iceland found that “over one in 10 people in their 60s and nearly one in four in their late 70s have an early form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).” According to study author Dr. Fridbert Jonasson, other recent studies have found that antioxidants and a diet rich in “fatty fish” may lower the risk of AMD. He noted that early detection of AMD “means that we can start this treatment early, so hopefully reduce the risk of late AMD.” Click below for a Medline report.

Share

A new study shows that even healthy, fit older adults have a “high degree of inactivity”

Monday, December 13th, 2010

A new study shows that even healthy, fit older adults have a “high degree of inactivity.” As part of the UK’s New Dynamics of Ageing Programme, the study was intended to help “establish a reliable mobility profile of the oldest-old members of society.” Lead researcher, Dr. Lynn McInnes of Northumbria University, said that “Being able to stay mobile is crucial to older people’s wellbeing, as loss of mobility means the loss of so many other things from their lives such as the ability to go shopping, meet friends and pursue hobbies and interests.” Click below for a report from the Economic and Social Research Council.

Share

Research indicates that endurance exercise increases our “ability to rejuvenate old muscles”

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Research indicates that “endurance exercise increases the number of muscle stem cells and enhances their ability to rejuvenate old muscles.” Prof. Dafna Benayahu, Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine, noted that “When we age, we experience sarcopenia, a decline in mass and function of muscles, and osteopenia referrers to bone loss.” The research team’s finds show that, by increasing the number of satellite cells (muscle stem cells), exercise leads to an enhanced ability to maintain proper muscle mass. A click below for a report from American Friends of Tel Aviv University.

Share

Scientists have developed a more accurate and less unpleasant method of diagnosing prostate cancer

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Utilizing ultrasound technology, researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and AMC Amsterdam have been able to trace the path of injected “microbubbles” through the prostate to determine not only the existence of tumors but also their rate of growth. The researchers noted that this information could help doctors to refrain from performing unnecessary operations and thus reduce overall medical costs.

Share

Whey, a cheese by-product, has been shown to help “significantly reduce elevated blood pressure.”

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Researchers at Washington State University found that “daily doses of commonly available whey brought a more than six-point reduction in the average blood pressure of men and women with elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures.” They noted that this level of reduction “can reduce cardiovascular disease and bring a 35 to 40 percent reduction in fatal strokes.” Lead researcher Susan Fluegel also noted that it is a low-cost supplement and that “whey protein has not been shown to be harmful in any way.” Please click below for a report from EurekAlerts

Share

The results of two recent studies could help older adults protect their vision

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has published the results of two recent studies that could help older adults protect their vision. In the first study, researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, found that the “Omega-3s in fish and seafood may protect seniors’ eyes.” The second study, from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, shows that “a test that measures the functionality of the eye’s retinal nerve cells may” could help provide early detection of glaucoma. Click below for a Eurekalert report on both studies.

Share

A recent study indicates resistance training is effective in lowering blood pressure.

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

A recent study indicates that resistance training has effects similar to aerobic exercise in lowering blood pressure. Researchers at Appalachian State University found that 45 minutes of “moderate intensity resistance exercise” led to a 20 percent decrease in blood pressure. Lead investigator Dr. Scott Collier noted that “resistance exercise increases blood flow which reduces blood pressure.” According to Dr. Collier, “any exercise is good. But if you can’t do aerobic exercise, resistance exercise can help decrease blood pressure and increase metabolism as well as provide social and psychological benefits” He also noted that “exercise has no adverse side effects.” Please click below for a report from Appalachian State University News.

Share